Moulding and Casting

Moulding and Casting – 1strubber coat.

Once the sculpture is finished and approved by the client, the next process is to make the mould. The clay is initially covered with a thin layer of silicone rubber (with the consistency of single cream). This is carefully applied to the clay surface using a brush, making sure that all the nooks and crannies are filled and that there are no trapped air bubbles. The second image here shows Andrew applying ‘Plastishim’ (his invention, which has become standard practice in all foundries and the film industry), which create the dividing walls/seams  for the forthcoming fibreglass jacket application.

Moulding and casting – 2nd rubber layer.

After all the Plastishim seams are in place, another coat of rubber is applied all over them and the sculpture. The picture shows Andrew’s technical assistants applying a thicker coat of rubber, completely covering everything.

Fibreglass jackets.

The image shows the first few fibreglass and resin jackets in place. The entire sculpture will eventually be covered in this way – it is a very time-pressured process which must be completed quickly and efficiently before the resin cures.

Prepping the mould.

Seen here is the finished hand mould. Andrew is trimming the rubber, tidying the seams and making sure that it fits snugly back into the fibreglass jacket. The rubber will be washed to remove the old dried-out clay before the mould is sent off to the foundry for next stage – casting in wax.

Removing the fibreglass jackets. You may not want to publish these in case they give too much away!

These are great images which I’ve included for you, but not too sure you would want to reveal how the figure looks – as we discussed, we don’t want to lose the WOW factor before the unveiling. Andy worked from 6am ‘til 10 pm the day before we flew to Canada – to make sure they were ready for the foundry-man

 

Filming with David Ainley

Filming with David Ainley.

David Ainley has been commissioned by the Duke of Wellington’s Regimental Appeal Committee to produce a film of the sculpting process for Memorial Sculpture – this was his first visit and gives you an insight into the amount of time and thought involved in this project with every attention to detail.

 

The Rapid Sketch Technique

The Rapid Sketch Technique – the uniform.

Once the soldier’s anatomy has been successfully established, Andrew then uses the Rapid Sketch Technique to position all the aspects of the uniform and the soldier’s equipment.These photos beautifully display how this system works effectively, showing how folds of cloth are implied by the application of linear clay strokes to the apparently naked human figure.

Sculpting the details.

You can see from these images how Andrew’s method now progresses, using smaller linear strokes to define shapes. This approach is rather like a camera lens coming into focus – as he moves around the figure in stages, gradually each shape or feature becomes clearer and more defined – this is the sculpting stage. Notably you will see some items, like buckles or buttons, which Andrew has pre-moulded and cast because multiples are required and it is an effective method of achieving great results. Props are also used to create surfaces that are difficult to represent in clay (eg. the drinks bottle)

  

Duke of Wellington’s Regiment Memorial Appeal Interview with Charles Wellesley, 9th Duke of Wellington at Apsley House

View the Duke of Wellington’s Memorial Appeal Interview with Charles Wellesley, 9th Duke of Wellington at Apsley house.

First Figure and the start of its construction

Constructing the Armature

Creating a good armature is essential, not just to capture the design of the figure from the outset, but crucially to provide strength and stability to support the clay sculpture. Andrew welds steel bar, cut and measured to scale, onto a moveable dolley base. A pre-made foam head is added and thick aluminium armature wire is used to create the flexible arms. Polystyrene is applied to the metal armature to bulk out the body and then carved into shape – this saves on the amount of clay used and makes the sculpture much lighter. (The rectangle on the back of the figure will form the bulk of the soldier’s back-pack).

 Scaling-Up.

This photo shows the Soldier 1 maquette with the measuring tools Andrew uses when scaling-up for a life-size figure.

Finding the Dynamic Curves.

Andrew applies the clay using the Rapid Sketch Technique, establishing the Dynamic Curves in the clay outline, which are essential for imbuing life and dynamism within the sculpture. Throughout this process he is continually using measurements, working to scale to perfect the figure’s life-size proportions.

The Rapid Sketch Technique– is a method of clay application designed by Andrew. Essentially the clay is applied in linear strokes, in the direction of the muscular anatomy it represents. This method keeps the clay surface loose and is used until all the measurements and the figure’s design are perfectly mapped out.

 

Duke of Wellington’s Regiment Memorial Appeal Interview with Calderdale Counsellor Geraldine Carter at Apsley House

View the Duke of Wellington’s Memorial Appeal Interview with Calderdale Counsellor Geraldine Carter at Apsley house.

Duke of Wellington’s Regiment Memorial Appeal Interview with Major Peter Robinson MBE at Apsley House

View the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment Memorial Appeal Interview with Committee Member Major Peter Robinson MBE at Apsley House.

Duke of Wellington’s Regiment Memorial Appeal Interview with Sculptor Andrew Sinclair MRBS

View the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment Memorial Appeal Interview with Sculptor Andrew Sinclair MRBS.

Duke of Wellington’s Regiment Memorial Appeal Interview with Brigadier Andrew Meek CBE at Apsley House

View the Duke of Wellington’s Memorial Appeal Interview with Appeal Fundraising Committee member Brigadier Andrew Meek CBE at Apsley house.

A Message from Robin Tuddenham Chief Executive of Calderdale Council

“We are delighted to be supporting the plans for a memorial to The Duke of Wellington’s Regiment in Halifax, its home for over 200 years.

“We know how important it is to local people to honour the Regiment, local soldiers and their families. The statue will provide a lasting legacy, adding to the Regiment Museum at Bankfield Museum in Halifax and the Regimental Chapel and Colours at Halifax Minster.

“The Duke of Wellington’s Regiment is a significant part of our local heritage, and our rich history is one of the incredible things that make Calderdale unique. Protecting and making the most of this heritage and supporting the Armed Forces is really important to the Council and our communities.

“We’re seeing unprecedented investment and focus upon Halifax and Calderdale, building on our heritage whilst creating an exciting new chapter. The memorial will reinforce the borough’s place on the map as a historic and cultural destination.”

Robin Tuddenham Chief Executive of Calderdale Council